Magazmeme

tdtscience:


The Carina Nebula

This beautiful image captures a 50 light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula. It is described on the Hubble News Centre as a place where “maelstrom of star birth - and death - is taking place”. The myriad of monster like stars that inhabit this nebula generate scorching ultraviolet radiation and outflowing winds that all come together to create an entrancing image. 
The incredible nebula contains at least a dozen stars that are estimated to be between 50 to 100 times the mass of our sun. It also contains the Eta Carinae, which is in the last stage of its brief lifespan, ready to become a titanic supernova.

According to the Hubble Site “This image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula assembled from 48 frames taken with Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble images were taken in the light of neutral hydrogen. Color information was added with data taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Red corresponds to sulfur, green to hydrogen, and blue to oxygen emission.”

tdtscience:

The Carina Nebula

This beautiful image captures a 50 light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula. It is described on the Hubble News Centre as a place where “maelstrom of star birth - and death - is taking place”. The myriad of monster like stars that inhabit this nebula generate scorching ultraviolet radiation and outflowing winds that all come together to create an entrancing image.

The incredible nebula contains at least a dozen stars that are estimated to be between 50 to 100 times the mass of our sun. It also contains the Eta Carinae, which is in the last stage of its brief lifespan, ready to become a titanic supernova.

According to the Hubble Site “This image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula assembled from 48 frames taken with Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble images were taken in the light of neutral hydrogen. Color information was added with data taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Red corresponds to sulfur, green to hydrogen, and blue to oxygen emission.”

tdtscience:

How We Discovered Chaos: Science with Kyle Retallick 
Edward Norton Lorenz, a famous pioneer of chaos theory, simply stumbled upon a new field of mathematics that encountered heavy resistance within the community. Lorenz, as a meterologist, had computed a rather crude set of equations in an attempt to predict the weather. A popular version of the story is that he inputted the same numbers into the model, but with less decimal places. Instead of 2.66666667, it might’ve been 2.67. What Lorenz had assumed was that such an insignificant change would have no effect on the results. He was wrong. 
The two graphs produced started out similar but soon diverged, to the point where they were so different to eachother you’d think that they never came out of the same model. Lorenz had ample opportunity to believe this to be a mistake on the part of the machine, he could even put it down to his rather crude attempt at emulating the weather with his equations. But Lorenz believed otherwise, he understood that he was on the verge of something that would shake up a world of determinstic effect. 
Lorenz summed it up as so “Chaos: When the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future. “

tdtscience:

How We Discovered Chaos: Science with Kyle Retallick 

Edward Norton Lorenz, a famous pioneer of chaos theory, simply stumbled upon a new field of mathematics that encountered heavy resistance within the community. Lorenz, as a meterologist, had computed a rather crude set of equations in an attempt to predict the weather. A popular version of the story is that he inputted the same numbers into the model, but with less decimal places. Instead of 2.66666667, it might’ve been 2.67. What Lorenz had assumed was that such an insignificant change would have no effect on the results. He was wrong.

The two graphs produced started out similar but soon diverged, to the point where they were so different to eachother you’d think that they never came out of the same model. Lorenz had ample opportunity to believe this to be a mistake on the part of the machine, he could even put it down to his rather crude attempt at emulating the weather with his equations. But Lorenz believed otherwise, he understood that he was on the verge of something that would shake up a world of determinstic effect.

Lorenz summed it up as so “Chaos: When the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future. “

(via tdtonline)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

(Source: flickr.com, via the-science-of-time)

andromeda1023:

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dying Star
Here is an image of the dying star Abell 36. The white-hot, now exposed, core of this once sun-like star shines powerfully in ultraviolet light. Indeed with a surface temperature of 73,000K (the Sun is around 5,500K at the surface) this stellar remnant is *brighter* in eye-ball-invisible UV light. Like a natural “black-light” the UV photons make the outer gases glow- we would not see the beautiful colors of these objects if the central star only emitted visible wavelengths of light. The Sun probably has a white dwarf-to-be in is core. Luckily the outer gases of the Sun shield us from its Earth-sterilizing heart… for now.
Image Credit: ADAM BLOCK/MOUNT LEMMON SKYCENTER/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA





(via TumbleOn)

andromeda1023:

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dying Star

Here is an image of the dying star Abell 36. The white-hot, now exposed, core of this once sun-like star shines powerfully in ultraviolet light. Indeed with a surface temperature of 73,000K (the Sun is around 5,500K at the surface) this stellar remnant is *brighter* in eye-ball-invisible UV light. Like a natural “black-light” the UV photons make the outer gases glow- we would not see the beautiful colors of these objects if the central star only emitted visible wavelengths of light. The Sun probably has a white dwarf-to-be in is core. Luckily the outer gases of the Sun shield us from its Earth-sterilizing heart… for now.

Image Credit: ADAM BLOCK/MOUNT LEMMON SKYCENTER/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

(via TumbleOn)

(Source: Wired, via the-science-of-time)

abcstarstuff:

Student-Built Rocket Lifts Off From the Bonneville Salt Flats

A student-built rocket lifts off the brilliant white hardpan of the Bonneville Salt Flats in Tooele County, Utah, May 17, during the “launchfest” that concluded the 2013-14 NASA Student Launch rocketry competition. Sixteen teams, comprised of some 250 student participants from 15 states, launched rockets of their own design, complete with three working science and engineering payloads apiece, cheered on by approximately 500 spectators. NASA Student Launch is an annual education event, designed to inspire young people to pursue studies and careers in the “STEM” fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The event is organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Group of Magna, Utah. The grand-prize-winning school team will be named by NASA and ATK in late May. > Read more Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/Dusty Hood

abcstarstuff:

Student-Built Rocket Lifts Off From the Bonneville Salt Flats

A student-built rocket lifts off the brilliant white hardpan of the Bonneville Salt Flats in Tooele County, Utah, May 17, during the “launchfest” that concluded the 2013-14 NASA Student Launch rocketry competition. Sixteen teams, comprised of some 250 student participants from 15 states, launched rockets of their own design, complete with three working science and engineering payloads apiece, cheered on by approximately 500 spectators. NASA Student Launch is an annual education event, designed to inspire young people to pursue studies and careers in the “STEM” fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The event is organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Group of Magna, Utah. The grand-prize-winning school team will be named by NASA and ATK in late May. > Read more Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/Dusty Hood

“It’s not fashion, it’s not sociology. It’s not something that you might find beautiful today but won’t find beautiful 10 years from now. The things that we find beautiful today we suspect would be beautiful for all eternity. And the reason is, what we mean by beauty is really a shorthand for something else. The laws that we find describe nature somehow have a sense of inevitability about them. There are very few principles and there’s no possible other way they could work once you understand them deeply enough. So that’s what we mean when we say ideas are beautiful.”

“it is precisely this that delights mathematicians in a great proof: not that it is correct but that it shows a tangibly human genius”

levantineviper:

Star-factory Cygnus X in infrared 
Image credit: ESA/PACS/SPIRE/ Martin Hennemann & Frédérique Motte, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu - CNRS/INSU - Univ. Paris Diderot

levantineviper:

Star-factory Cygnus X in infrared 

Image credit: ESA/PACS/SPIRE/ Martin Hennemann & Frédérique Motte, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu - CNRS/INSU - Univ. Paris Diderot

(Source: levantineviper-archive, via the-science-of-time)

tcmtoday:

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